All Certified Uganda Top Responsible Investments (Award Winners 2012 - 2017)

Ndejje University (NDU)

Ndejje University (NDU) was Voted for by the People of Uganda and Certified by Public Opinions as Winner of the 2012 and 2014 Uganda Responsible Investment Award (URI AWARD) as the Best Road Construction Company in Uganda. A key contributor to attainment of Uganda Vision 2040 and United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

Established in 1992, Ndejje University (NDU) is the oldest private university and the fastest growing in Uganda. In 1995 the University gained its status under the ownership of the Anglican Diocese of Luweero. Later in 2002, the ownership base was expanded to include all six Church of Uganda Dioceses in Buganda Region in what became known as “Ndejje University Foundation Consortium.” The Consortium is registered as a Company Limited by Guarantee, not having share capital. It is responsible for appointing the Chancellor, the Vice Chancellor, and Chairperson of the Council including members of the University Council.

In 2009 the University was chartered by the National Council for Higher Education (NCHE) of Uganda meaning that all certificates awarded at the University where nationally and internationally recognized. Also, all courses offered in the university were accredited by the same body. The University further subscribes to the Inter University Council for East Africa and Association of African universities.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tel: +256392730321

MOTORCARE

MOTORCARE has been offering automotive services for business-to-business in Uganda since 1977. As an authorized premium brand distributer, MOTORCARE provides the best automotive solutions, parts and accessories, as well as access to one-stop maintenance and repair services, combined with a full spectrum of fleet management solutions.


MOTORCARE’s national footprint extends to Kampala, Hoima, Gulu, Mbarara and Mabale.

MOTORCARE aims to develop the business in a profitable and responsible way by pursuing social and environmental goals, based on international standards and certifications.

MOTORCARE Nissan achieved a fully integrated ISO certification status of international standards in ISO9001; ISO14001 and OHSAS 18001. This cements our competitive advantage and commitment to meet our customers’ highest expectations of providing high standards of service, with consciousness of operational impact on the environment, and recognition for health and safety practises. ISO 14001 Certification criteria followed by MOTORCARE stipulates the standards to identify and control our environmental impact and with this we can constantly improve on our performance on the environmental front. ISO 9001 Quality management system ensuring the quality of products, services and documentation. Standardised customer service and the way in which customer requirements are met. OHSAS 18001 An internationally recognised occupational, health and safety management system which requires MOTORCARE to have appropriate health and safety standards, policies and practices in place to operate safely.

The KJAER Group Way of Management is a zero tolerance approach towards corruption. As a result; a Group anti-corruption policy was implemented in 2013 and states the code of conduct for all KJAER GROUP employees. It covers among others payments and gifts, partner assessment, risk evaluation and whistle-blower procedures.

The group strongly supports and has aligned own initiatives with the global campaigns, launched by the United Nations.

NO Payments / NO Gifts / NO Free travel/ NO Free social entertainment.

 

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Uganda Peoples’ Defence Forces (UPDF)

Uganda Peoples’ Defence Forces (UPDF)
UPDF is a Winner of the 2014 Uganda Responsible Investment Award and recognised by Public Opinions International with Uganda Sustainable Development Award and a Certified Development Champion in appreciation of its greatest contribution towards attainment of Sustainable Peace and Development of Uganda as well as its contribution towards attainment of Uganda Vision 2040 and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

Uganda Peoples’ Defence Forces was so named in the 1995 Constitution of the Republic of Uganda. It was initially called the National Resistance Army which was the Force that fought the February 6, 1981 to January 26, 1986 Liberation war that saw the final overthrow of dictatorship in Uganda. NRA picked up the struggle from earlier Liberation struggles of the 1970’s against oppressive and anti People Governments in Uganda.

Right from the immediate post-colonial era, the state was by nature and characters an oppressive one. At independence, the same army recruited, trained and left behind by the colonialists just changed the name from King’s African Rifle (KAR) to first Uganda Rifles (UR) and then Uganda Army (UA). KAR’s main function was to repress and suppress any opposition to the British rule. The senior non commissioned officers in KAR, like Idi Amin, who had been promoted on account of their brutality against the MAU MAU freedom fighters, became officers in the UA. It would be excessive naivety to expect the rule of terror to have changed by a mere change of guards.

For the first two decades of her independence, Uganda had to contend with problems of national unity and cohesion because of its military which was characterised by anti-people attitude and manipulation.

It is against such background that in 1972, a young Ugandan man called Yoweri Museveni launched a liberation struggle under the name “Front for National Salvation” (FRONASA). There were other forces in the 1970’s struggle against Idi Amin that in March 26, 1979 merged with FRONASA to form the Uganda National Liberation Front (UNLF) with its military wing, the Uganda National Liberation Army (UNLA). They included Kikosi Maalum (led by Milton Obote with Tito Okello and David Oyite Ojok as commanders), and other smaller groups like Save Uganda Movement (led by Akena P'Ojok, William Omaria and Ateker Ejalu) and Uganda Freedom Union (led by Godfrey Binaisa, Andrew Kayiira and Olara Otunnu), that after the merger fought alongside Tanzania Peoples’ Defence Forces to oust Idi Amin’s dictatorship in April 1979.

UNLF ruled Uganda from the overthrow of Amin until the disputed national elections in December 1980 in which Obote was declared a winner after massively rigging elections. This prompted Yoweri Museveni to lead a final Liberation struggle under the National Resistance Movement (NRM) with its military wing the NRA that in February 6, 1981 started protracted guerilla warfare with only a platoon of fighters, 27 of whom were armed.

The NRA guerilla force persisted, being at the fore front of quelling the dictatorships of the time, and in 1986 they registered a landmark in the much needed liberation after a five-year people’s protracted war that climaxed in defeat of fascism in Uganda. This liberation brought about the restoration of dignity amongst the people and the state. From 1986, the NRM under President Yoweri Museveni embarked on, among others, formation of a constitution and in 1995, it was promulgated.

That is how the NRA became the UPDF. The UPDF is a nonpartisan force, national in character, patriotic, professional, disciplined, productive and subordinate to the civilian authority as established under the constitution.

Members of the Uganda Peoples’ Defence Forces are citizens of Uganda of good character who are recruited from every District of Uganda.

The UPDF is regulated by laws made by parliament of Uganda, and, in particular, providing for—

  1. The organs and structures of the Uganda Peoples’ Defence Forces;
  2. Recruitment, appointment, promotion, discipline and removal of members of the Uganda Peoples’ Defence Forces and ensuring that members of the Uganda Peoples’ Defence Forces are recruited from every district of Uganda;
  3. Terms and conditions of service of members of the Uganda Peoples’ Defence Forces; and
  4. The deployment of troops outside Uganda

 

COMPOSITION OF THE UPDF

The UPDF is a bi service;

  1. Land Forces
  2. The Air Forces

 

The UPDF Act provides for room of creation of other services as prescribed by parliament. The Reserve Forces and Special Forces are under that process.

 

MISSION

To preserve, defend and protect the people, property, sovereignty and territorial integrity of Uganda, contributing to regional stability and supporting international peace initiatives.

 

UPDF MANDATE

To preserve and defend the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Uganda.

Uganda Peoples’ Defence Forces was so named in the 1995 Constitution of the Republic of Uganda. It was initially called the National Resistance Army which was the Force that fought the February 6, 1981 to January 26, 1986 Liberation war that saw the final overthrow of dictatorship in Uganda. NRA picked up the struggle from earlier Liberation struggles of the 1970’s against oppressive and anti People Governments in Uganda.

Right from the immediate post-colonial era, the state was by nature and characters an oppressive one. At independence, the same army recruited, trained and left behind by the colonialists just changed the name from King’s African Rifle (KAR) to first Uganda Rifles (UR) and then Uganda Army (UA). KAR’s main function was to repress and suppress any opposition to the British rule. The senior non commissioned officers in KAR, like Idi Amin, who had been promoted on account of their brutality against the MAU MAU freedom fighters, became officers in the UA. It would be excessive naivety to expect the rule of terror to have changed by a mere change of guards.

Learn more at https://www.updfmil.go.ug/

 

UPDF MODERNISATION THEMES

  1. Equipped and trained for combat and peace support operations,
  2. Sustainability and logistic support,
  3. Joint/combined operations,
  4. Technology and doctrine,
  5. Policy and planning,
  6. Finance,
  7. Procurement and infrastructure,
  8. Personnel and welfare.

FUNCTIONS OF THE DEFENCE FORCES

  1. To preserve and defend the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Uganda;
  2. To cooperate with the civilian authority in emergency situations and in cases of natural disasters
  3. To foster harmony and understanding between the defence forces and civilians; and
  4. To engage in productive activities for the development of Uganda.

 

STATEMENT OF OBJECTIVES

  1. Defend the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Uganda.
  2. Build adequate and credible defense capacity to address external threats and in the medium term assist in maintaining internal security.
  3. Create a productive and self-sustaining force.
  4. Ensure adherence to and furtherance of international obligations.
  5. Ensure continuation and strengthening of the Defense forces that has respect for Human Rights.
  6. Create military alliances to enhance regional security and stability
  7. Maintain national cohesion.
  8. Promote co-operation with the East African countries, which share common political, economic, social and cultural values, and interests.
  9. Support regional and continental integration through the East African Community and African Union.

CENTER FOR DOCTRINE SYNTHESIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT (CDSD)

About CDSD

The Centre for Doctrine Synthesization and Development is responsible for the development of Uganda People’s Defence Forces’ (UPDF) doctrine. It is located at the Ministry of Defence/UPDF General headquarters, at Mbuya hill, in Kampala. It is currently headed by a senior officer at the rank of Major General with the title of Commander. The centre has full time staff; Civilian and UPDF personnel in active service, as well as the retired.

Mission

To enhance research and doctrine development in order to contribute to the generation and consolidation of UPDF capabilities

 

UPDF DOCTRINE

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Meaning of Doctrine

Doctrine is a “set of beliefs that are held to be true by a given body” – Gen YK Museveni. It is what is believed to be the best way to do things. Military doctrine provides the framework within which the planning and execution of decisions and actions about military operations is conducted. It provides guidance for the training and preparations of the forces; their positioning and employment in the battlefield; and to the understanding of what is to be achieved, why and how. It is descriptive but not prescriptive, and the detailed application is left to the field commanders. Military doctrine is a guide to action which provides a common framework for reference across the military. It serves as a concise expression of how the military forces contribute to campaigns, battles and engagements

 Doctrine in the UPDF

After the promulgation of the 1995 Constitution of Uganda, the National Resistance Army (NRA) became UPDF. Article 208 of this constitution establishes the Forces while Article 209 spells out its functions as Preserving and defending the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Uganda; cooperating with civilian authority in emergency situations and in case of natural disasters; fostering harmony and understanding between the defence forces and civilians; and engaging in productive activities for the development of Uganda.

In 2001, in order to further the consolidation and transformation of the UPDF from a guerrilla army into a modern, accountable, efficient and professional Defence Force, a Defence Review was undertaken, and amongst others, it recommended the development and formalization of a doctrine for the force as one of the modernization themes. It was recognized that doctrine would be influenced by support and direction from the political authority; and the successful experiences of the force, while guiding the type, size, and character of the force structure; and the nature, quality, discipline, and morale required of its personnel.

The implementation of the unit was effected in 2005 with a desk under the office of the Chief of the Defence Forces (CDF). Preliminary work began and after two years, the Doctrine desk was upgraded into a Directorate. In 2009, the C-I-C renamed the directorate the Centre for Doctrine Synthesization and Development that is currently at Strategic Level.

Perspective

Whereas Uganda has existed since 1894 as a nation state with some military formations of sorts up to 1980, there has not been any documented doctrine for Uganda’s military. What guided the military, then, were the values and aspirations of the colonial powers. This is signified by the fact that the military supported the anti-people and exploitative ideologies of the colonialists.

In the past 50 years, Uganda has been independent, the UPDF (formerly NRA) has fought more wars than any former military establishment. Even in the Eastern Africa and Great Lakes region, UPDF has fought more wars than any other force. The UPDF is now part of the regional and continental mechanisms for prevention, resolution and management of crisis in an effective and efficient manner. UPDF’s doctrine, therefore, will help to standardize operations and facilitate readiness by establishing common ways of achieving ends within available means.

Following the recommendations of the Uganda Defence Review, the UPDF became Bi-service force; with a higher headquarter providing strategic guidance to a Land Force Component and the Air Force. Furthermore, the force now operates in a multinational environment in order to meet various international obligations. It is fair, therefore, to assume that future operations will be Joint, and that many will be combined. Technological advancements will also not only offer new weapon systems but also demand new capabilities, which should drive UPDF’s organizations, structures and training. This increased complexity will require improvements in procedures, planning and execution of operations guided by strategic thought written in the form of a doctrine.

 Levels of Doctrine in the UPDF

Doctrine in the UPDF is written at various levels that are mutually supportive:

The Strategic Doctrine

This is the apex of military doctrine in Uganda. It provides the strategic conceptual framework for making strategic military decisions. It establishes the rationale, articulates the philosophy and general principles that guide military activity within the UPDF; conveys understanding but not instructions, based directly on government policy and designed specifically for the UPDF. It functions to establish the framework of understanding of the approach to warfare in order to provide the foundation for its practical application.

Service Doctrines

They exist at the second level and are written to guide the services operating in different theatres. They are sponsored by particular theatre or service commanders, deriving authority from the strategic doctrine. Their purpose is to give guidance to formations and units, and to inform the execution of campaigns, operations and tactical maneuvers.They may be classified to a large extent.

Tactical doctrines

These are the third part of the hierarchy that provides the main body of instructions of the force.  They arise from both strategic and Operational Doctrines, providing a common foundation on which all tactical commanders base their plans.

The various Field Manuals and standing operating procedures provide the core of this doctrine.

 

For more information, contact;

 

Commander CDSD

Ministry of Defence

Chwa II Road, Upper Mbuya hill

P.O.BOX 3798 Kampala

Tel: +256414565214/+256414565211/+256414565179

Fax: +2567 414565186/222183

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FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL ORGANISATION UGANDA

FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL ORGANISATION UGANDA was Voted for by the People of Uganda and Certified by Public Opinions as a 2017-2018 Uganda Certified TOP50 Sustainable Development Agency. A key contributor to attainment of Uganda Vision 2040 and United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

FAO and Uganda have a long history of cooperation. The Organization’s technical assistance in the country began as early as 1959 in the areas of aquaculture development and livestock disease control. Cooperation has increased since the opening of FAO’s representation in 1981, with interventions comprising national policy and programme formulation, agricultural and rural development projects, and emergency and rehabilitation assistance. More recently, emphasis has been given to building resilience to the effects of climate change.

 

FAO’s cooperation with Uganda Government is shaped by the Country Programming Framework (CPF) 2015-2019, jointly developed with the Government and other partners.

 

Over the years, the stature and influence of FAO in Uganda has grown considerably. Currently, the country programme comprises well over 20 projects with a combined budget of close to 80 million USD, which makes FAO one of Uganda’s significant development partners. FAO projects are mainly field-based, addressing on-ground pertinent issues.

Until 2010, FAO’s support programme emphasized emergency and rehabilitation following two decades of insurgency in Northern and North Eastern Uganda. The current CPF however, focuses more on long-term development objectives aimed at revitalizing agricultural production and productivity and spurring economic development for the country.

FAO Uganda therefore falls under the Development Programme. FAO’s development interventions aim to support and build resilient agriculture-based livelihoods. Our interventions focus on crops, livestock, fisheries, forestry and their interaction with the environment, Climate change and building resilience. Further, FAO gives guidance in drafting effective legislation and creating national strategies to achieve transformational development and alleviate hunger

FAO has a long association with Uganda. From as far back as 1959, it has supported the Government of Uganda to undertake various evaluation and research such as; on carp and tilapia fish for aquaculture, control of ticks and tick-borne diseases, tsetse fly and other livestock diseases. The highlight of the association was in 1979 when FAO and the Government of Uganda signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for the establishment of a Representation Office in Uganda. Subsequently, the FAO Uganda Country Office opened in 1981 in Kampala, and has remained operational since then. Over the years, the stature and influence of FAO in Uganda has grown considerably. Currently the country programme comprises well over 20 projects with a combined budget of close to USD 70 million, which makes FAO one of Uganda’s significant development partners. FAO projects are mainly field-based, addressing on-ground pertinent issues. The mid-term review of the Country Support Strategic Framework (CSSF) 2010 – 2014, the predecessor of this CPF, indicates that substantial progress was made in all the focal areas1 of the framework, resultantly addressing some of Uganda’s medium-term priorities. This illustrates FAO Uganda’s capacity to achieve the objectives of its programmes and projects, and

 

FAO Representation in Uganda
Plot 88 Buganda Road, Wandegeya
P.O. Box 521, Kampala
Tel: +256 414 349916/7 
      +256 414 340324/5
Fax: +256 414 250579
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Certified a "Certified Development Champion" by

Public Opinions International
Kampala,Uganda
Web:www.publicopinions.net
Tel:+256701992426

For More information and to participate in the 2019-2020 Uganda Sustainable Development Agencies Guide and Poster, Please contact Public Opinions International, website: www.publicopinions.net, Tel:+256701992426